Categories
creativity

Wait, but first

Some people call it Monkey Brain, but I like to think that those whose minds have a tendency toward “Wait! But first I have to [fill in the blank],” those who never seem to sit down long enough to remember the many items they’ve added to their lists, actually have an advantage when it comes to creativity. Adam Grant, psychology professor and author of The Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World, puts it this way: “Procrastination may be the enemy of productivity, but it can be a resource for creativity.”

Case in point: when I was in college, I had a really hard time starting my papers unless my room was clean and all the small items on my to-do list were taken care of (which in college usually meant emptying my trash can and balancing my checkbook; that was still a thing in those days). I had a really hard time focusing in on that big idea when there was so many little clouds covering my sun. But, once those clouds were blown away, I had no excuse and I found the peace to focus.

What it took me a long time to realize is that while I was doing all of those small tasks, my brain was already working on what compelling argument I’d make in my next thesis, or how I’d tackle the next original logo mark or clever tagline. My brain was picking through what worked and what did not, what felt novel and inspired, as I dutifully checked off the items on my list.

In the same book, Grant puts it this way: “If originals aren’t reliable judges of the quality of their ideas, how do they maximize their odds of creating a masterpiece? They come up with a large number of ideas.” Not all of those ideas are winners. We need to learn to give ourselves the time and space to try them on for size and poke them a bit. See if they can stand up to being looked at and interrogated. I, as do many creatives, tend to do this in the background without even realizing it sometimes. (Ever wake up with a great idea but no paper to write it on?)

Procrastination has a bad rap. It is normally characterized as an avoidance of work towards a purposeful end. But I’ve learned to give in to my need to tidy my space, because in essence, it allows me to tidy my mind as I’m keeping my body busy.

Some people do this better by exercising before a big project, walking the dog, cleaning out their refrigerator, or even, yes, still balancing their checkbook. As our society’s advancements in technology have made outcomes so immediate, communication so instantaneous, we’ve lost the time we used to allow ourselves to draw out those ideas.

Think about it. I’ve typed this entire post in a matter of minutes, when 100-plus years ago, a person had to take a pen to a paper, scratch out words that didn’t work or add sentences in the margins to reiterate a point. Ink leaked, pages were stained by teacups and that was all part of the process. That extra time it takes to draw out each word, in cursive, feel the nib of the pen imprint the paper as it skates out the ink of one’s ideas, that is the space where true creativity finds a home. Inside those measured, careful hand motions is a crucial pause in our minds that we’ve lost now that we can so easily hit “delete.”

Successful creatives today have found ways to add that time, that connection, back into their consciousness. Whether it be procrastinating in whatever way suits you, or finding a slow hobby (mine is knitting), creativity is best inspire when body and mind are in tune with one another in a very tactile and intimate way. How can that happen when your bed’s not made?! That time spent busying myself with wrote tasks I could do in my sleep freed up my brain and allowed for that next big, new Aha! find its new home.

So, next time this happens to you, don’t be frustrated with yourself. Give into the taskmaster knowing that perhaps your brain is just dangling a carrot at the end of that to-do list.

Categories
education marketing

Hold on. Hold on to me.

You got the students. Now how do you keep them?
A three-pronged prescription for private school retention post-pandemic

[ I write this hoping that the words “post-pandemic” will actually be a thing someday. I always like to focus on the positive, so we’ll go with it for now. ]

According to a recent article in EdWeek, generally speaking, private schools saw an increase in student populations in the fall of 2020. After many failed online learning experiments, disgruntled and exhausted parents frantically looked for a way to keep their children on a path to educational success.

“In a survey released Aug. 3 by the University of Southern California Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research, 22 percent of respondents with K-12 students said they would change schools for the 2020-21 school year… of those who reported a school switch, 28 percent said the change is ‘somewhat’ or ‘very much’ influenced by experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“Public Schools Catch Parents’ Eye as Public School Buildings Stay Shut” by Evie Blad, EdWeek, August 6, 2020.

Suddenly, schools that had not enjoyed the comfort of a waiting list for years were suddenly bursting at the seams with new admissions while simultaneously working feverishly to create a hybrid learning environment for the coming school year that would put parents’ and teachers’ expectations at ease. These expectations included small class sizes (hard to accomplish when you have full classes), individualized learning plans (even harder for teachers who have one-third more students in their class and can only come within 4 feet of them), and options that would fulfill online and in-person learning outcomes with equal rigor and consideration.

For some families, this fall became the first time, outside of daycare, they paid “extra” for educating their children. The value of a stretched dollar now has even more importance tied to it, and families are eagerly awaiting to see if the product they’re paying for—that private schools have always insisted is better—is worth it. No pressure. Here are 3 tips to make their enrollments last.

Remember: Experience doesn’t always mean expertise.

It’s a precarious balancing act. How do you keep improving a relatively new style of hybrid education with thoughtful intention while also making sure parents know that you’re nailing it? (Or, at least doing better than your competitors.) During my three years as Marketing Director for an independent school, I realized the school’s greatest referral audience is its current families, and its greatest advertisers are its classrooms. Not the rooms, per se, but what happens inside of them.

With much of the employed nation still working from home, they are taking their due breaks from the onslaught of Zoom meetings. During this time, social media has amplified its role as a quick and easy brain break. Use that to your advantage and get your teachers to help. Though they are juggling additional students and an in-person as well as an online persona, much of the work their students will be doing will be independent. Remind teachers that when they can’t sit next to little Tamira, they can at least take a picture of her working. Make it easy. Create a Google Drive folder with the week as its name, and subfolders with grades or divisions, share it with your entire faculty/coach/student council community, and ask that they share at least one photo a week. If, in my experience, you only get 20 percent contributing, you’ll still have enough to work with and remind parents of the unique and innovative program their children are enjoying while in your school’s experienced hands. Bonus: Some prospective families, already fatigued by this year’s public school challenges, will be trolling your social media accounts to see what the alternatives are doing.

2 Saying “no” doesn’t mean the client will never approach you again.

Become a thought leader. Encourage your head of school and/or Board Chair to write editorials for the local newspapers. Get the Parents’ Association to partner with local child-development authorities to offer webinars to help families navigate their children’s futures and mental health during these times. Think social workers, pediatricians, learning development experts—all can offer useful knowledge to your families that will increase the value of what their student is already receiving in the classroom. Plus, the businesses get exposure to potential customers in return. Use your social media channels to spread useful advice from the experts. One parent told me an article I had posted from the New York Times when the pandemic hit that advised families on how to keep a routine for their children during online school was instrumental to their child’s success and their sanity.

3 Six of one, half a dozen of the other—give or take.

Indexed or discounted tuition is not a new concept for private schools who have struggled for years to maintain financial sustainability. Based on a family’s income, schools may have adopted a model that discounts the tuition in exchanged for a bright, willing student to join the ranks and fill the seat. Consider a similar option for enrolled families: A tuition freeze, or a sustainable discount over the course of their enrollment (think: even a sort-of-high tide raises all ships) can do wonders fro retainment.

Your families will have enjoyed a year of hands-on, individualized learning for their children. They’ll be so proud of their children’s progress, they will want to continue this. Seal the deal by making it financially palatable.

Now, this may not seem sustainable as cost of living increases keep happening and teachers still appreciate raises, but think about what a full school will do for your brand image in the long run! Suddenly, you are now the school to be in, with excellent academics and programming, and—more important—happy families who see you as the considerate partner in their family’s educational (and financial) wellbeing.


While there’s never a one-size-fits all solution to student retention, for the most part, reminding families that the investment they are making in their children will lay the groundwork for their success in life is an emotionally compelling argument for private schools to make. With the future economy even more uncertain, having a good education under its belt will only help this next generation make the smart decisions required for personal and national success.